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Congregational Staff
Rev. Craig Robertson, Pastor
Rev. Craig Robertson
 Pastor




KrisyUrie
Kristy Urie
Secretary


Jessica Hove
Jessica Hove
Child Care

Something to think about . . .

We affirm a belief in the Son, Jesus Christ. We say that God took on human form, came and lived among us, suffered the same trials that we suffered, experienced the same feelings that we experienced. Jesus was purely human and purely divine. Jesus was not God. Jesus was God incarnate. There is a difference. Jesus never drew attention to himself but always pointed to God.

Soren Kierkegaard, the great Danish theologian of another century tells a story of a prince who wanted to find a maiden suitable to be his queen. One day while running an errand in the local village for his father he passed through a poor section. As he glanced out the windows of the carriage, his eyes fell upon a beautiful peasant maiden. During the ensuing days he often passed by the young lady and soon fell in love. But he had a problem. How would he seek her hand?

He could order her to marry him. But even a prince wants his bride to marry him freely and voluntarily, and not through coercion. He could put on his most splendid uniform and drive up to her front door in a carriage drawn by six horses. But if he did this, he would never be certain that the maiden loved him or was simply overwhelmed with all the splendors. The prince came up with another solution. He would give up his kingly robe. He moved, into the village, entering not with a crown but in the garb of a peasant. He lived among the people, shared their interests and concerns, and talked their language. In time, the maiden grew to love him for who he was and because he had first loved her.

This very simple, almost childlike story, written by one of the most brilliant minds of our time explains what we Christians mean by the incarnation. God came and lived among us. I am glad that this happened for two reasons: 1) It shows beyond a shadow of a doubt that God is with us, that God is on our side, and that God loves us. 

2) It gives us a firsthand view of what the mind of God is all about. When people ask what God is like, we as Christians point to the person of Jesus Christ. God himself is incomprehensible. But in Jesus Christ we get a glimpse of God’s glory. In the person of Jesus, we are told that God, that mysterious substance that created the stars and the universe, that God is willing to go all the way, even to a cross, so that a single person may be redeemed. That's what God is like.

First, may we, as father’s, be like God, accepting and loving our children for who they are. Secondly may we be willing to sacrifice our selfishness for our children. May we be willing to learn how to be loving, accepting and selfless as Jesus showed us who God is in this world. If we can be loving, accepting, and selfless fathers for our children, we will teach our children how to face and overcome a selfish world.

Something to think about and do . . .

Love you all and happy Pentecost!

Rev. Craig

The Disciples of Christ Chalice

Sheryl Miller, Parrish Nurse
Sheryl Miller
Parish Nurse



Colton Collins
Custodian



Phineas Pope
Pianist



Disciples of Christ History

The Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) began in the early 1800s in the United States. Seeking to move beyond denominational disagreements, the founders envisioned a united church modeled on the New Testament.
Disciple congregations today share these characteristics:
  * Each congregation is self-governing and calls its own pastor.
  * Worship services may be formal or informal, and include lay women and men in leadership.
  * Open discussion of issues is encouraged. Diversity of opinion is common.
  * We are growing in racial and ethnic diversity. 
  
Disciples affirm that Jesus Christ is the son of the Living God, and offers saving grace to all. Disciples also believe that all persons are children of God.

Disciples practices and beliefs include:
Open Communion - The Lord's Supper, or Communion, is celebrated in weekly worship. It is open to all who believe in Jesus Christ.

Freedom of Belief
- Disciples are called together around one essential of faith: belief in Jesus Christ as Lord and Savior. Persons are free to follow their consciences guided by the Bible, the Holy Spirit, study and prayer, and are expected to extend that freedom to others.

Baptism by Immersion
- In baptism the old self-centered life is set aside, and a new life of trust in God begins. Although Disciples practice baptism by immersion, other baptism traditions are honored.

Belief in the Oneness of the Church
- All Christians are called to be one in Christ and to seek opportunities for common witness and service.

The Ministry of Believers
- Both ministers and lay persons lead in worship, service, and spiritual growth.
 
The symbol of the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) is a red chalice, emblazoned with a white St. Andrew's cross. The chalice symbolizes the central place of communion in worship. The X-shaped cross of the disciple Andrew is a reminder of the ministry of each person and the importance of evangelism.

Spreading GOD’s
Love…
Hope…
Joy…
with YOU!


Chalice

Capitol Hill Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) * 3322 E. 25th Street * Des Moines, IA 50317




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